Bridges: Intercultural Conversation

Carol Dussere and Mary French

In memory of Darcy Shipman
welcome
WELCOME

WELCOME TO THE ROUNDTABLE

Hi.  My name is Anne.  Every week a group of my friends, both Koreans and Westerners, meet in a Seoul coffee shop to talk.  We represent differences in race, sex, culture, nationality, age, occupation, social class, religion, political opinion and lifestyle.  You’re welcome to join us, listen and then talk about the issues in your own groups.

Links: How to Use this Book (Link), Map of Volume 1 (Link), Map of Volume 2 (Link), Why Study IC (Link), About the Authors (Link), Welcome ( Link ), Title pages (Link). The picture above and on the title page come from downtown Pittsburgh PA. Others are of friends and students.

BRIDGES 1

who-we-are-mod-1
CHAPTER 1

WHO WE ARE

A Westerner’s experience in Korea, personal gains from foreign travel, “Us” versus “Them.” Cultural bridges: Psychological dimensions of cultural and racial differences. Key concepts:  Generalization, prejudice, impression, stereotype, race, ethnic group; use of metaphorical language. Grammar: “What” clauses.  (Link)

flags-mod-1-ch-2
CHAPTER 2

IS EAST THE OPPOSITE OF WEST?

Contrast of Korea and North America using cultural dichotomies. Cultural bridges:  Understanding the big differences to explain the little differences. Key concepts:  Authoritarian, authority-centered, individualism, community, collectivism, guilt, shame. Skills:  Recognition of key concepts in context.  Discussing with particular emphasis on the accurate use of terms.  Application to real-life situations. Grammar: Modals. (Link)

say-what
CHAPTER 3

CHAPTER 3: PERSONAL QUESTIONS

Several explanations for foreigners’ unfavorable reactions to personal questions. Cultural bridges:  Examples of how cultural mores affect individual behavior on a subconscious level. Key concepts:  Defensive, mores, personal, privacy, sensitive, share, small talk. Grammar: Logical and dummy subjects.  (Link)

nonverbal
CHAPTER 4

NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION

Clashes in Western and Asian cultural norms for non-verbal behavior;  “disgusting” habits, walking, personal space, privacy, and lining up. Cultural bridges:  Examples of how culture and habits affect non-verbal behavior on a sub-conscious level; awareness through participation in a culture game. Key concepts:  Behavior, nonverbal, taboo. Grammar: Infinitives and gerunds. (Link)

using-two-hands
CHAPTER 5

DEFERENCE IN KOREA

The successes and amusing blunders of Westerners attempting to deal with Korean hierarchies at home and in the workplace; verbal and nonverbal communication. Cultural bridge: Stories of Westerners who are attempting to deal with often complex situations to create empathy for non-Koreans. Key concepts: Deference, politeness, respect. Grammar:  Relative clauses. (Link)

CHAPTER 6

FAMILY STRUCTURE

Traditional and modern Korean families, patriarchy versus matriarchy from European American and African American life, the experience of a single mother. Cultural Bridges: Students increase their awareness of the different possibilities in family structure and in the roles which can be assumed by family members. Key concepts—matriarchy, role.  Vocabulary–discipline, extended family, housekeeper, housewife, lenient, nuclear family, patrilineal, role model, strict, unconditional love. Grammar:  Participles and gerunds. (Link)

working-1
CHAPTER 7

WORKING

An American businessman’s blunders, special recognition, working hours, the influence of the military on company life in Korea, the vertical hierarchy, the merit system versus the seniority system, job assignments and horizontal interaction. Cultural Bridges:  Students increase their awareness of how a different corporate structure in East and West affects the working environment. Key concepts: hierarchy, merit, power distance, seniority. Grammar:  Passive. (Link)

wed-demo
CHAPTER 8

WOMEN’S HISTORY

The history of the women’s movement in the U.S. as related to possible developments in Korea.  Aspects of the democratic process are also explained.Cultural Bridges:  Students increase their awareness of parallels between the changes in women’s status in the US and in Korea. Key concepts–accountability, constituent, democracy, equality, lobby, participation, republic. Grammar:  word formation.(Link)

maple-leaf
CHAPTER 9

CANADIANS SPEAK–Reading for extra credit paper:  Rountable discussion on Canadian cultural identity. (Link) 

 

 

 

BRIDGES 2

flags-mod-1-ch-2
CHAPTER 1

SAME AND DIFFERENT

Westerners’ experience in Korea, contrast of Korea and North America using cultural dichotomies, “Us” versus “Them.” Cultural bridges: Psychological dimensions of cultural and racial differences; understanding the big differences to explain the little differences. Key concepts:  Authoritarianism, authority-centeredness, individualism, collectivism, race, ethnic group, generalization, prejudice, stereotype, impression. Grammar: Nouns—countable, uncountable, plural, mass, collective nouns. (Link)

CHAPTER 2

FRIENDSHIP AND RESPECT

Types of friendships in North America, distinction between respect in North America and deference in Korea. Cultural bridges: Differences in the formation and expression of relationships. Key concepts: Deference, politeness, respect ,the mentor and role model. Terms of address; suggestions and requests. Grammar: Articles in fixed phrases. (Link)

chris-and-alan
CHAPTER 3

DATING                         

Dating in North America; Korean and American experience with intercultural dating. Cultural bridges:  Similarity and differences in expectations and behavior; complexity of this phenomenon even within one culture. Key concepts: Arranged marriage, dating, chauvinism, commitment, expectations and support. Grammar: Cross-referencing.(Link)

CHAPTER 4

GETTING THROUGH SCHOOL

Experience of putting oneself through college in North America and Korea; Korean experience at an American college. Cultural bridges:  Similarity of work and school experience; cultural differences in the classroom. Key concepts: Independence, individualism, being self-sufficient/self-supporting. Grammar: Prepositions. (Link)

newspaper-agenda
CHAPTER 5

MILITARY MATTERS

Cultural aspects of the US military presence in Korea; experience of Korean-speaking US servicemen and a former KATUSA. Cultural bridges: Explanations for culture clash, misunderstandings; examples of successful, happy adaptation. Key concepts: Culture shock and the ghetto. Grammar: Adverbs. (Link)

women-at-work
CHAPTER 6

WOMEN AT WORK     

Status of women in the Korean workplace; observation and experience of American businessmen in senior positions and a successful Korean professional woman. Cultural bridges:  International perspective on a worldwide phenomenon, gender-based discrimination. Key concepts: Discrimination, sexism and issues.Grammar: Indirect speech. (Link)

farmers-market
CHAPTER 7

DOING BUSINESS

Different expectations of business people from contract-based and relationship- based cultures; employment contracts, shopping and consumerism. Cultural bridges: Recognition of potential pitfalls. Key concepts: Agreement, contract, warranty, consumer, customer, retail and wholesale. Grammar: Conjunctions. (Link)

uso
CHAPTER 8

GETTING ALONG

Historical background; oral history of a Korean-African-American war baby; conflict between blacks and whites, blacks and Koreans; personal solutions. Cultural bridges: Understanding conflict as a result of oppression. Key concepts: Diversity, heritage, integration, segregation, oppression, and racism. Grammar:  Particle hop; “get.”  (Link)

learning-korean-ways
CHAPTER 9

LEARNING KOREAN WAYS

Reading for extra-credit paper: Long-term American residents in Korea on their experience with Korean shamanism, birth dreams and Buddhist temple-painting. (Link)

 

PLUS

SUPPLEMENT

FOR TEACHERS  

Here’s advice on how to use the book, a summary of the value of learning intercultural communication, rationale, texts for listening tasks, surveys, sample exams, audio-visual supplements, sources for roundtable discussions.`(Link)